Calendar

Illustration from 1881 US Patent 248872, for a...

Illustration from 1881 US Patent 248872, for a perpetual calendar paperweight. The upper section is rotated to reveal one of seven lists of years (splitting leap years) for which the seven calendars below apply. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What many people want to do, however, based on old habits of writing daily to-do lists, is put actions on the calendar that they think they’d really like to get done next Monday, say, but that then actually might not, and that might then have to be taken actually over the following days. Resist that impulse. You need to trust your calendar as sacred territory.

That’ll be much easier if the only things in there are those that you absolutely have to get done on that day.

David Allen

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